​WHAT CAUSES IT?
  • A meniscal tear can occur during sport when the knee is flexed then twisted.

  • Degeneration of the meniscus can also occur.

 

WHAT IS IT? MENISCAL TEARS

  • Menisci protect the cartilage within your knee.  There is a medial meniscus and a lateral meniscus.  The medial meniscus is more prone to injury because it is fixed to the capsule within the knee joint.

  • The role of the meniscus is to act as a shock absorber, protect the underlying cartilage, and provide stability for the knee.

     

 

Signs and symptoms

  • Feeling of tearing at time of injury
  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Loss of bending and straightening movements of knee
  • Locking
  • Clicking
  • Clunking
  • Grinding
  • Tender joint line
  • Aggravated by squatting
HOW TO SELF MANAGE
  • R.I.C.E. protocol

  • Depending on the severity, a meniscal tear can be managed conservatively or arthroscopically.

  • An assessment by your physiotherapist is recommended to gain assessment and possible referral if required.

     

PROGNOSIS
  • An MRI or arthroscopic investigation can determine the severity of your tear.

  • Return to sport following a minor tear may be possible after 4-6 weeks

  • A more severe tear, where clunking and locking is present, range of movement is not improving, and other damage is apparent, will require surgery.

HOW PHYSIO HELPS?
  • Assess your knee for meniscal damage
  • Reduce pain and swelling with massage and electrotherapy
  • Prescribe a program to improve quadriceps control
  • Increase the strength of hip and knee muscles to improve overall knee stability
  • Increase proprioception to reduce the risk of re-injury
  • Progress your rehabilitation for return to daily activities and sport

 

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