Shoulder
 

The shoulder is one of the largest and most complex joints in the body. The shoulder joint is the main joint of the shoulder. It is a ball and socket joint that allows the arm to rotate in a circular fashion or to hinge out and up away from the body. The joint capsule is a soft tissue envelope that encircles the glenohumeral joint and attaches to the scapula, humerus, and head of the biceps. It is lined by a thin, smooth synovial membrane.

Important bones in the shoulder include:

  • The scapula or shoulder blade. A large triangular-shaped bone that lies in the upper back. 

  • The clavicle or collarbone. A long bone that serves as a strut between the shoulder blade and the sternum (breastbone). 

  • The humerus. A long bone in the upper arm located between the elbow joint and the shoulder. The humerus fits relatively loosely into the shoulder joint. This gives the shoulder a wide range of motion, but also makes it vulnerable to injury.

The shoulder has several other important structures:

  • the rotator cuff is a collection of muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder, giving it support and allowing a wide range of motion.

  • the bursa is a small sac of fluid that cushions and protects the tendons of the rotator cuff.

  • a cuff of cartilage called the labrum forms a cup for the ball-like head of the humerus to fit into.

  • The acromion is a bony projection off the scapula. The clavicle (collarbone) meets the acromion in the acromioclavicular joint.

  • The coracoid process is a small hook-like structure on the lateral edge of the superior anterior portion of the scapula . Pointing laterally forward, it, together with the acromion, serves to stabilize the shoulder joint.

 

OPENING HOURS

Monday-Friday: 8:00am - 8:00pm

​Saturday: 8:00am - 12:00pm

Sunday: By Appointment​

 

ADDRESS

Sammy Margo Physiotherapy

444 Finchley Road

London

NW2 2HY

Email: physiophysio@hotmail.com

Tel: ​020 7435 4910​​​
Fax: 020 7435 0461

Web: sammymargophysiotherapy.com

FIND​ US

Disclaimer: Information made available by AskPhysio (Sammy Margo Physiotherapy) is provided for guidance only and should not be considered as medical recommendations or advice.  AskPhysio is not responsible for errors or omissions in the information. Please consider what the best options for your healthcare are, based on the urgency of your condition and nature of your condition. Please consult a GP or Healthcare Specialist to discuss any specific concerns that exist prior to using the information provided.